MARS 4910 / 4920

 

Last Updated November 21, 2011

Having problems?

Email me:

khyrenbach (at) hpu (dot) edu

     
   
   
   

We will meet on wednesday evenings, for 14 weeks:

from September 7 to December 7

There will be NO final exam.

Sept 7 - Week 1: Introduction to the Course

Discussion: Course Goals and Syllabus

Developing a Syllabus for the Course

Critically Discussing Papers: An Example

For Scientists, a Beer Test Shows Results as a Litmus Test

Grim T. 2008. A possible role of social activity to explain differences in publication output among ecologists. Oikos 117(4): 484–487.

Sheil D., Wunder S., Jansen P., Bongers F. & Dudley R. 2008. Hope for Bohemian ecologists – comments on "A possible role of social activity to explain differences in publication output among ecologists?” by Tomáš Grim, Oikos 2008. Web Ecology 8: 103–105.

Moya-Larano J. 2008. A break to moderate drinkers. Web Ecology 8: 106–107.

 

Sept 14- Week 2: Defining "Ecosystem-Based Management"

Willis A. J. 1997. The ecosystem: an evolving concept viewed historically. Functional Ecology 11(2): 268-271.

Grumbine R.E. 1994. What is ecosystem management? Conservation Biology 8: 27-38.

Grumbine R.E. 1997. Reflections on "What is Ecosystem Management?" Conservation Biology 11: 41-47.

Ruckelhouse et al. 2008. Marine Ecosystem-Based Management in Practice - scientific and governance challenges. Bioscience 58(1): 53-63.

 

Assignment: Come to class ready to discuss papers

Assignment - by Sept 19 (monday):

Email the instructor a literature review topic ideas.

(Please refer to the week 1 presentation for details)

NOTE: You may want to select a research topic from these case studies

(Adrift Book "on reserve" in Atherton Library)

Sept 21 - Week 3: Group Discussion

Hypothesis Testing & Ecosystem-Based Management: A Case Study

DeMaster, D.P., et al. 2006. The sequential megafaunal collapse hypothesis: Testing with existing data. Progress in Oceanography 68 (2-4): 329-342

Springer, A.M., et al. 2003. Sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: An ongoing legacy of industrial whaling? Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 100 (21): 12223-12228

Follow-up Reading

Springer, A.M., et al. 2008.Mammal-eating killer whales, industrial whaling, and the sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: A reply to critics of Springer et al. 2003. Marine Mammal Science 24(2): 414–442

 

Assignment:

Everyone in the class is expected to read and evaluate the assigned papers, and to address the questions listed here:

Paper CritiqueForm

The instructor will lead the evaluation of each paper (using powerpoint slides and the white eraser board). This critique will address the main points listed here:

Tips for Reading Scientific Papers

Assignment - by Sept 26:

Email the instructor two potential discussion papers.

(Please refer to the week 2 presentation for details)

 

Sept 28 - Week 4: Mind Maps & Outlines (snacks: KDH)

Assignment: Students Present Mind Maps and Review Outline

- Prepare graphics before class: Use a paper poster OR powerpoint

- Each student will have 5 mins (Presentation) + 5 mins (Q / A)

 

Assignment: Students submit Review Outline

(Please refer to the week 2 presentation for details)

 

Oct 5 - Week 5: Students Lead 3 Discussions (snacks: Julie)

Stephanie

Bovia

Crawford et al. 2011

Julie-Anna

Dietz

Diana 2009

Elizabeth

Sheets

Kim & Miller 2007

Assignment:

Presenters will summarize and lead the evaluation and group discussion of each paper (using powerpoint or white eraser board). Each presenter will have up to 45 minutes.

Everyone in the class is expected to read and evaluate the assigned papers, and to address the questions listed here: Paper Critique Form

 

Oct 12 - Week 6: 4 Students Lead 4 Discussions (snacks: Stephanie)

Kirstyn

Kesler

Granek et al. 2009

Margaux

Filippi

Roark et al. 2009

Wally

Ito

Stimson et al. 2007

Dan

Matthews

Baum & Worm 2009

Assignment:

Presenters will summarize and lead the evaluation and group discussion of each paper (using powerpoint or white eraser board). Each presenter will have up to 45 minutes.

Everyone in the class is expected to read and evaluate the assigned papers, and to address the questions listed here: Paper Critique Form

 

Oct 19 - Week 7: Group Activities: Writing / Survey (snacks: Margaux)

We will devote this class meeting to two goals:

I. Assemble a questionnaire for next week's fish survey.

Assignment:

Read these two papers and come to class ready to discuss.

(Do not score papers using the Paper Critique Form)

Kaiser & Edwards-Jones 2006

The Role of Ecolabeling in Fisheries Management and Conservation

Jacquet et al. 2010

Seafood stewardship in crisis

 

 

II. Discuss effective writing and common roadblocks.

Assignment:

Come to class ready to discuss how you are organizing your review paper - and how you are setting up your comparisons / synthesis of the results from the individual papers you read and evaluated.

Everyone will bring to class a piece of problematic writing (from a paragraph to a page) to share with the class and to work on with a peer. Email the text to the instructor by wednesday morning, so we can project it on the screen.

Oct 26 - Week 8: The End of the Line (snacks: Wally)

(Note: KDH at NCEAS)

Watch Documentary & Think About It

Students Work on Reviews and Presentations

and Conduct Seafood Surveys

Use the enclosed Excel file to enter your data from three stores.

 

Assignment - by Oct 31:

Email the instructor your seafood survey results.

(Please refer to the week 7 presentation for details)

Assignment - Nov 2:

Come to next class ready to discuss your results of the seafood survey and the "end of the line" documentary

 

Nov 9 - Week 10: 3 Review Presentations I (snacks: KDH)

(45 minutes each)

Stephanie Bovia

Fisheries Bycatch of Turtles

Julie-Anna Dietz

In-situ Cage Aquaculture

Wally Ito

Managing Introduced Limu

 

Nov 16 - Week 11: 4 Review Presentations II (snacks: Dan)

(45 minutes each)

Margaux Filippi

Deep-Sea Coral Management

Dan Matthews

Fisheries Impacts on Sharks

Kirstyn Kesler

Ecological Benefits of Ecotourism

Elizabeth Sheets

Deepening of the Thermocline

 

 

Nov 23 - Week 12: Students Work on Proposal Presentations

 

Due Date: Nov 28: Proposal Outline (by email)
Assignment:


Forward brief text (4 paragraphs, < 2 pages) to instructor outlining the following:


- Paragraph 1: Brief Introduction:

Why is this topic compelling and how does it relate to EBM?



- Paragraph 2: Working Hypothesis:

What hypothesis / hypotheses are you going to test?

 

- Paragraph 3: Approach:

How are you going to test the hypotheses?


- Paragraph 4: Outcomes:

What do you expect to find out - what will be the outcome(s)?


- References:

Reference any statement included in text and add complete references

(NOTE: Email slides to instructor to khyrenba@gmail.com by Nov 28)
(Use message title "MARS 4910-4920 - Proposal Outline- yourname")

 

Nov 30 - Week 13: Proposal Study Design Discussions (snacks: Liz)

Assignment:

Come to class ready to discuss the focus of your proposal (explicitly address the central question or hypothesis) and how you are setting up your comparisons / controls to test this hypothesis (explicitly stating which dependent / independent variables you will be quantifying).

Everyone will present a powerpoint with 4 slides (20 minutes each):

- Slide 1: Hypotheses: What are they? Where do they come from?

- Slide 2: Experimental Design: What comparisons are you proposing?

- Slide 3: Controls & Measurements: Explain what will be your dependent / independent variables and how will you control for other factors?

- Slide 4: Questions: Lay out problems / doubts you want help with.

(NOTE: Email slides to instructor to khyrenba@gmail.com by Nov 29)
(Use message title "MARS 4910-4920 - Proposal Discussion - yourname")

 

Dec 7 - Week 14: 6 Proposal Presentations (snacks: KDH)

(20 minutes each)

   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

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